Tags: Diarrhea

Extrapulmonary P Carinii Infections

Extrapulmonary P carinii infections occur in < 3% of patients and must be diagnosed with histopathologic samples. Primary prophylaxis for PCP with pentamidine may confer a higher risk for extrapulmonary infection. Symptoms of extrapulmonary involvement are nonspecific, usually consisting of fevers, chills, and sweats.

Fusarium, Penicillium, Paracoccidioides, & Agents of Chromomycosis

Fusarium spp. is an emerging fungal pathogen. Although long recognized as a cause of local infection involving nails, traumatized skin, or the cornea (eg, in contact lens wearers), deep or disseminated infection was not described until the mid 1970s. Despite its worldwide distribution and its frequent recovery from soil and vegetative material, infection is quite rare. Only ~ 100 cases involving invasive disease in immunosuppressed patients have been described in the medical literature.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF)

RMSF is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and is an acute tick-borne illness occurring during seasonal tick activity. The disease is characterized by acute onset of fever, headache, and a rash of the extremities spreading to the trunk. A. Epidemiology.

Coxiella, Ehrlichia, & Rickettsia

Once inside a host cell, Coxiella and Ehrlichia spp. remain within a vacuole where they progress through distinct developmental stages; in contrast, the Rickettsia spp. escape the endocytic vacuole and replicate within the host cell cytoplasm. Ehrlichia and Rickettsia spp. are transmitted by arthropod vectors. Coxiella burnetii is the causative agent of Query or Q fever.

Chlamydia Psittaci Infections

Pneumonia, pericarditis, myocarditis, and endocarditis have been attributed to C psittaci infection (psittacosis or ornithosis) (Box 5). The incubation period for the pneumonia is usually 1-2 weeks. Its onset is gradual with body temperature increasing over a period of 5-7 days; however, there are cases in which the onset is sudden with rigors and temperatures as high as 104 °F.

Actinomycetes

Originally thought to be fungi due to their hyphae-like appearance, they are now recognized as bacteria based on their cell wall components, reproduction by fission without sporulation or budding, inhibition by antibacterial agents, and molecular phylogenetic analysis. The actinomycete chromosomes contain a high content of guanosine and cytosine.

Other Mycobacteria

The increasingly relative importance of the atypical mycobacteria, many of which are ubiquitous in the environment, was recognized with the decline in tuberculous disease. Generally, atypical mycobacteria are unusual causes of disease in patients who are immunocompetent but can in immunocompromised hosts such as AIDS and cancer patients.

Mycobacterium Avium Complex (Disseminated & Pulmonary Disease)

Mavium is the most common atypical mycobacterium to cause disease in humans. In immunocompetent patients, M avium can cause pulmonary disease (Box 1). It is the most common pulmonary pathogen of all the atypical mycobacteria. There are several risk factors for pulmonary M avium infection besides AIDS.

Brucella, Francisella, Pasteurella, Yersinia, & Hacek

Brucellosis (also called undulant fever, Mediterranean fever, Malta fever) is an infection that causes abortion in domestic animals. It is caused by one of six species of Brucella coccobacilli. It may occasionally be transmitted to humans, in whom the disease could be acute or chronic with ongoing fever and constitutional symptoms without localized findings.

Yersiniosis

Conditions that are associated with increased risk for Yersinia spp. infections (yersiniosis) include iron overload states (such as in patients who receive chronic blood transfusions or those with hemochromatosis) and the use of desferrioxamine, a bacterial siderophore. Infections caused by Y enterocolitica are more common in children than adults.